Archive of May 2021

A simple nfs server on centos

At the server end

choose a server as the nfs-server, do things below in root role

dnf -y install nfs-utils
mkdir /mnt/nfs-share
chown -R nobody /mnt/nfs-share/

vim /etc/exports
add a line
/mnt/nfs-share 192.168.178.0/255.255.255.0(rw,sync,all_squash)
save and exit

systemctl enable nfs-server
systemctl start nfs-server

At the client end

dnf -y install nfs-utils
mkdir /mnt/nfs-local
chown -R nobody /mnt/nfs-local/

vim /etc/hosts
add a line, replace 192.168.xxx.yyy to the IP addr of your NFS server
nfs-server 192.168.xxx.yyy 

vim /etc/fstab
add a line
nfs-server:/mnt/nfs-share  /mnt/nfs-local   nfs defaults   0 0
save and exit
 
mount -a # to confirm what you have done is right

other utils:

You could use showmount -e 192.168.xxx.yyy to get a share list from the nfs server.

Don't simple unset them afterward when using `shopt` change a setting

Sometimes we need to run shopt -s dotglob nullglob before moving files including dotfiles. So there's another question, do we need to set it back afterward? The most correct answer is

It's usually not clear if either dotglob or nullglob were already set before running shopt -s to set them. Thus, blindly un-setting them may not be the proper reset to do. Setting them in a subshell would leave the current shell's settings unchanged:

( shopt -s dotglob nullglob; mv ~/public/* ~/public_html/ )

Reference: Jeff Schaller's answer under this question